• MyFairJulia@lemmy.world
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    11 months ago

    He’s right. I kept the wound open and completely bled out. Lost all of my blood. But it’s worth it because i didn’t get Tetanus.

    Did you know you can stop rabies by having someone chop your head off?

    • ImplyingImplications
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      11 months ago

      Did you know you can stop rabies by having someone chop your head off?

      That’s probably the preferred treatment over dying of rabies induced violent psychosis.

      • Jumper775@lemmy.world
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        11 months ago

        I wonder what it’s like to be in a rabies induced violent psychosis. Also why it’s like while you’re still somewhat sane, but fear water.

        • holmesandhoatzin@slrpnk.net
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          11 months ago

          According to the CDC, it’s four doses, preferably in the arm, over a two week period. I think I remember reading about someone who worked at a rescue or rehab that had to get several shots in the shin, around the bite site, but I don’t remember why.

          • wildbus8979@sh.itjust.works
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            11 months ago

            Four~five shots is just immunization, there’s also two shots of immunoglobulin… That one is usually in the affected area if it is known, otherwise it’s in the bottocks. And also probably tetanus shot if you’re not up to date…

            Source, had a bat in my house a few years ago… Good times!

            • holmesandhoatzin@slrpnk.net
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              11 months ago

              Yikes! I had no idea about the immunoglobulin. It’s better than the alternative, but I hope you never have to go through that again.

              • wildbus8979@sh.itjust.works
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                11 months ago

                I would rather it not happen again, but if I ever had a doubt I’d do it again in a heartbeat! Not a pleasant experience, but I’m not gonna lie it’s a great story to recount at parties!

                What I found really crazy is thinking of the anxiety it would have caused us if we had been south of the border (my partner is from the US). Even the co-pay might have been thousands of dollars and, being pretty broke at the time (they were a student and I had lost my job to COVID), we might have thought twice about getting treatment. Out of pocket, being that I no longer had insurance, it would have been probably tens of thousands for the two of us.

        • russjr08@outpost.zeuslink.net
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          11 months ago

          I believe that only works if you manage to catch it extremely early. Once it advances past a certain point, they don’t have a treatment to my knowledge (though I’d be happy to hear I’m out of date on that…).

          • Landrin201@lemmy.ml
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            11 months ago

            If you get bitten by a rabid animal and go get the shots immediately after your chance of actually dying from rabies is very, very low. The studies I know claim it’s very close to 100% effective, which is understandable because of the very long incubation period rabies has, if you have antibodies it doesn’t stand a chance.

          • Raistlin@lemmy.sdf.org
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            11 months ago

            There is the Milwaukee protocol, but that is almost never successful, usually results in brain damage, and has only been used a handful of times. Also it’s banned in many locations from the inherent risk and lack of evidence for it working at all.

        • Wahots@pawb.social
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          11 months ago

          You get two in the arm, and one or two in the ass. Then a fifth later iirc. We had to get our rabies vaccines about a decade ago. A decent number, but none in the stomach.

          Nice thing is, for the next five years, you are almost immune, and only need a booster if bitten again.

          I’d always get the booster though. Rabies ain’t worth gambling on.

  • Nougat@kbin.social
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    11 months ago

    All you have to do is tell the tetanus “I do not consent,” and by law, it cannot infect you.

  • MooseBoys@lemmy.world
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    11 months ago

    He’s technically correct - if you bleed fast enough for long enough, you won’t get infected by anything that needs a live host to grow.

      • TheGreenGolem@lemm.ee
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        11 months ago

        I can imagine the guy just pumping out his own blood like crazy laughing hysterically “You can’t poison me you fools!”

    • seejur@lemmy.world
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      11 months ago

      I mean, it makes some sense if you get bitten by a snake, since its poison is not literally everywhere around you (hence why in older time they try to suck it out as much as possible). But the problem for viruses is that as soon as you stop gushing out blood, the bacteria/viruses nearby the wound will try to enter the bloodstream anyway

      edit: or the fact that the veins are a one way, therefore if the virus is already inside, and you let blood out, you let out the blood which is clean. Or the fact that once inside, the virus might already be infecting cells and therefore is out of the bloodstream. or…

    • KrisND@lemmy.world
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      11 months ago

      Valid conclusion, I’m cancelling my health insurance rn. More money for scratchers, hell yeah!

    • lorez@lemm.ee
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      11 months ago

      Cos not every attack comes from a bleeding injury. Joking of course. This guy is nuts.

  • ruckblack@sh.itjust.works
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    11 months ago

    Alright, give this guy an old fashioned blood letting with some leeches when he’s feeling under the weather.

  • Ducks@ducks.dev
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    11 months ago

    Tetanus is fucking terrifying. I’m happy to have chemicals to protect me from that.

  • Astroturfed@lemmy.world
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    11 months ago

    People are just so confident in the bullshit they think is correct and have no proof of. It sounds right so it is. Must be.

    • Trihilis@feddit.nl
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      11 months ago

      At some point I feel like we should just let these people conduct their own health experiments, the problem will take care of on itself. You can only try your best at educating people but if they choose to be stupid there is nothing you can do.

  • assassin_aragorn@lemmy.world
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    11 months ago

    They must be thinking that our body is like a municipal water system. The water is usually kept at high pressure so that if there’s a leak or rupture, the water will gush out violently enough to prevent anything from contaminating the system for everyone else.

    The key thing they’re missing though is gushing violently. The body generally doesn’t bleed vigorously enough to prevent foreign agents from getting in – and most of the time when it does, you’re having severe blood loss.

    The only exception I think is around the anus. If you’ve had hemorrhoids you’ve seen just how much they can bleed, and I think that’s to generally keep things out since it’s an unclean area. Still, if you sat down with a bleeding ass in contaminated water, you’re still going to get infected.

  • Semi-Hemi-Demigod@kbin.social
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    11 months ago

    They’re not entirely wrong, which is frustrating.

    Tetanus is an anaerobic bacteria which means exposure to air will kill it. If a cut is bleeding that means it’s at least partially exposed and may prevent tetanus. The reason people tend to get tetanus infections from puncture wounds is because the wound heals up and seals out the air.

    Also, letting a cut bleed for a bit is one way of flushing any foreign material from the wound, which can help. But you still need antibiotics and a bandage to reduce the risk of infection.