For me, it’s Factorio.

a game in which you build and maintain factories.

It even has Wayland support!

(Version 1.1.77» Fri Mar 03, 2023 3:44 pm)

Graphics

  • Added support for Wayland on Linux. To enable it, set SDL_VIDEODRIVER=wayland in your environment. (thanks to raiguard)

What’s yours?

EDIT: Great Linux ports* not like some forced ports that barely work or don’t.

      • 9bananas@lemmy.world
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        23 days ago

        the DLC are pricey, but they’re also proper, old school expansions adding lots of content that actually enhances the game.

        it’s perfectly playable without the DLC, and there’s a LOT of DLC-sized mods on the workshop!

        kind of a fundamental problem with modern DLC: they generally don’t get cheaper over time (remember when that was an actual thing? not just sales, but actually lower prices for older games?).

        if you keep up with the releases it’s super okay at about 20/25€ once a year, maybe twice, bur if you’re late to the party it’s a whole lot of cash all at once!

        exactly why paradox introduced a subscription for Stellaris’ DLCs at 10€/month… honestly kinda worth it, if you know you’re just gonna play for a while and then move on…still wish stuff would just get cheaper at some point again…

        • Psyhackological@lemmy.mlOP
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          22 days ago

          So it’s a biiiig rabbit hole, then.

          Well, Factorio price policy says that they will never have a discount for their game. Full price only so you’re committed.

          it’s super okay at about 20/25€ once a year, maybe twice, bur if you’re late to the party it’s a whole lot of cash all at once!

          Yeah, exactly.

          exactly why paradox introduced a subscription for Stellaris’ DLCs at 10€/month

          I didn’t even know there was such a thing. Sucks, though.

    • Avatar_of_Self@lemmy.world
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      23 days ago

      It is also DRM free on Steam. You can copy the rimworld folder to a PC that’s never had Steam on it and play it as an example.

      You can also do that to sort of save a snapshot in time of Rimworld when they are releasing a new version that will likely break mods for a long time/sometimes forever.

      • apotheotic(she/they)@beehaw.org
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        23 days ago

        I think that farewell and the c-sides are some of the most enjoyable, challenging, and rewarding gaming experiences I’ve ever had. Keep it up!

        • Psyhackological@lemmy.mlOP
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          22 days ago

          This game always amazes me with “fuck, no I cannot do that”, but after trial and error I get better, and I know I overcome my skill issues.

            • Psyhackological@lemmy.mlOP
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              22 days ago

              Yeah, but the default keyboard controls suck. And I think there is somewhere in the game “every time you fall and die - it’s a progress” or something like this.

              • apotheotic(she/they)@beehaw.org
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                22 days ago

                I can imagine the keyboard controls sucking.

                And yeah, those messages are exactly the thing that makes the vibe so cozy. You’re failing again and again and the game keeps encouraging you, believing in you.

    • Father_Redbeard@lemmy.ml
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      24 days ago

      I did not know that. Might have to double dip. I have it on switch, but encouraging Linux game ports with my wallet seems worthwhile. Plus it wouldn’t be the first time I bought a second copy of a game…

      • Psyhackological@lemmy.mlOP
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        23 days ago

        I had many copies of the same game now on Steam when I committed 2 years ago for Linux gaming. I preferred GOG back then, but with Proton and much friendliness of Valve, I prefer Steam now.

  • Liome@pawb.social
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    24 days ago

    Minecraft, Stellaris, and Valheim were already mentioned so I’m gonna add Neverwinter Nights.

  • Rez@sh.itjust.works
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    24 days ago

    I was going to say Factorio as well! :D Hollow Knight has a native port and is a fantastic game, but my favorite games are ones like OpenMW or DevilutionX where the entire engine is remade from the ground up and open-source

    • samc@feddit.uk
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      23 days ago

      Its all about how an application goes from “I would like to display X on a screen” to how X actually gets displayed. Wayland is effectively a language (technically a protocol) that graphical applications can speak to describe how they would like to be drawn. It’s then up to a different program more deeply embedded in your OS to listen to and act on those instructions (this program is called a Wayland compositor). There’s a lot more to it (handling keyboard input monitor settings, etc), but that’s the general idea.

      Wayland is a (relatively) new way of thinking about this process, that tries to take into account the wide variety of input and output devices that exist today, and also tries to mitigate some of the security risks that were inherent to previous approaches (before Wayland, it was very easy for one application to “look at” what was being displayed in a completely different app, or even to listen to what keys were being typed even when the app isn’t focussed).

      Thing is, change is hard, doubly so in the consensus driven world of Linux/FOSS. So, until the last couple of years or so, adoption of Wayland was quite slow. Now we’re at the point where most things work at least as well in Wayland, but there’s still odd bits of software that either haven’t been ported, or that still rely on some features that don’t exist in Wayland, often because of the aforementioned security risks.

      • Jarix@lemmy.world
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        23 days ago

        Thing is, change is hard, doubly so in the consensus driven world of Linux/FOSS.

        … So if im reading this right

        Move fast and break things

        Move slow and fix things?

        • vrighter@discuss.tchncs.de
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          23 days ago

          more like "move glacially and declare things as "will not support’ so technically we had nothing TO fix!"

    • Psyhackological@lemmy.mlOP
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      23 days ago

      I see X11 and Wayland as display protocols that tell to render things on the screen, for example to Desktop Environments like Gnome or KDE Plasma. X11 wasn’t originally designed for this purpose, and its codebase is very messy and ‘hacky,’ which led to the development of Wayland.

      X11 Wayland
      Legacy Modern
      Many issues due to being legacy Many issues due to being Modern
      Old New
      Stable Experimental

      in short.