• alcoholicorn@lemmy.ml
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    2 months ago

    Ciabattas are way older than that, a guy only patented it in 1982. Ask anyone who was around at the time, they were hugely popular in the 60s and 70s.

    • Warl0k3@lemmy.world
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      2 months ago

      Yeah some of these seem dubious. Pasta Primavera is one of the oldest styles of pasta dishes out there. Maybe the date is when the name was given to it?

  • AllNewTypeFace@leminal.space
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    2 months ago

    If chicken tikka masala has the UK flag and not the Indian one, then nachos should have the US flag, as it was invented in the US (by a Mexican cook named Ignazio, or “Nacho”)

    • sushibowl@feddit.nl
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      2 months ago

      Wikipedia says you are incorrect:

      The dish was created by, and named after, Mexican restaurateur Ignacio Anaya, who created it in 1943 for American customers at the Victory Club restaurant in Piedras Negras, Coahuila.

      That’s just south of the border in Mexico.

    • nyctre@lemmy.world
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      2 months ago

      Ignacio varga?! Kidding. But that explains the nickname. Or is it like dick and richard ? Altho…now that I think about it, nacio and nacho aren’t that far away, so it probably precedes the whole thing. Either way, Cool.

  • Dizzy Devil Ducky@lemm.ee
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    2 months ago

    Not gonna lie, bubble tea is older than I thought. I thought for some reason it was a product of the 90s. Couldn’t tell you why, other than it just feels right.

  • cosmicrookie@lemmy.world
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    2 months ago

    You could have convinced me that farton was a weight or energy unit.

    ‘The moon weighs 58 fartons’

    It takes 3 fartons to move your mum a decimeter

    • Railcar8095@lemm.ee
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      2 months ago

      It roughly translates to “thing that feds you up”, or “glutton”. So really, could be

      • Obi@sopuli.xyz
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        2 months ago

        Without looking it up, I believe it was because they were producing so much salmon and looking for ways to make it more popular.

        • Chip_Rat@lemmy.world
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          2 months ago

          I recall watching a YouTube deep dive on it and basically it was debunked. It’s raw fish, people have been eating it on sushi rice since fish and rice existed. But Norway did push it heavily in the 80’s.

          It might have been that Andong guy…

              • JayObey711@lemmy.world
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                1 month ago

                People in Japan did not eat salmon sushi because it was considered unsafe. The type of salmon caught by Japanese fishermen is not fit for raw consumption. That’s why salmon sushi only got popular when Norwegian companies exported the fish.

  • MintyFresh@lemmy.world
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    2 months ago

    Missed pad Thai. Pulled right from the Wikipedia article:

    Although stir-fried rice noodles were introduced to Thailand from China centuries ago, the dish pad thai was invented in the mid-20th century. Author Mark Padoongpatt maintains that pad thai is “…not this traditional, authentic, going back hundreds of years dish. It was actually created in the 1930s in Thailand. The dish was created because Thailand was focused on nation-building. So this dish was created using rice noodles and it was called Pad Thai as a way to galvanize nationalism.”

    Another explanation of pad thai’s provenance holds that, during World War II, Thailand suffered a rice shortage due to the war and floods. To reduce domestic rice consumption, the Thai government under Prime Minister Plaek Phibunsongkhram promoted consumption of noodles instead. His government promoted rice noodles and helped to establish the identity of Thailand. As a result, a new noodle called sen chan pad thai (named after Chanthaburi Province) was created. Pad thai has since become one of Thailand’s national dishes. Today, some food vendors add pork or chicken (although the original recipe did not contain meat because of the government’s perception that pork was a Chinese meat). Some food vendors still use the original recipe.

    • groet@infosec.pub
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      2 months ago

      It is a food that’s newer than it seems but the post specifically calls out foods created after ww2

  • jaschen@lemm.ee
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    2 months ago

    Wtf, I live in Taiwan and never knew the Mongolian beef was made by us.

  • ActionHank@sopuli.xyz
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    2 months ago

    Caesar salad needs to be added to Mexico’s cultural trophy room as well, I only recently learned. Tiramisu is the ultimate fancy imo. I’ve always loved Mexican food, but am discovering that I love it more than I realized!