Like there is so much salt in processed food I never felt the need to actually use the salt shaker (until I cut out processed food).

What does this mean for iodine intake? [FYI iodine was added to salt a long time ago because they found people were low in iodine. At the time people used salt shakers. Are we low now because, I’m figuring, people don’t use salt shakers as much? Some googling says processed food doesn’t use iodized salt.]

    • @ImplyingImplications
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      92 months ago

      This. Prepared meals are seasoned meaning the salt has already been added. When you make your own meals, you need to season it yourself.

    • @[email protected]
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      72 months ago

      This is the answer for me too. I don’t really use the salt shaker at restaurants. But, more often than not, we cook our own food at the house and use salt as necessary.

    • @[email protected]
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      32 months ago

      Same. I use granulated salt from a jar near the stove while cooking, and there’s a grinder on the table for when I forget.

    • @[email protected]
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      32 months ago

      When cooking i use a large wide mouth jar salt is dirt cheap in bulk and it makes a more consistent addion proccess as u get the feel for how much a pinch is.

  • @[email protected]
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    132 months ago

    I cook my own food, which takes plenty of salt. I just have a little bowl full of kosher salt is use while I’m cooking. Generally, if you are a good cook, you shouldn’t need to add any salt at the table. If you go to a fancy restaurant, you won’t see any salt shakers. Salt typically needs to be worked into food to actually work well. There’s a huge difference in taste between bread made with dough that has salt in it, and bread with the same amount of salt added after baking.

    The only times you need to really add salt at the end of cooking is if you taste it and find that you undershot the right amount of salt, or if you want to give a salty “pop” to something like a salted caramel. For those cases, a flaky salt works way better that table salt because its surface area means that it dissolves quicker, giving you that quick taste (and crunch) without actually adding much mass of salt.

    • @[email protected]
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      32 months ago

      Same, it’s funny seeing others say they cook at home, so they always use the shaker. I’m just thinking you’re supposed to add it while cooking, not at the table. I have a mason jar full of salt I keep next to the stove.

      But fair enough adding it at the table if there’s not enough. For me though if I had to do that, i’d also add some extra to the pot.

      • @[email protected]
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        12 months ago

        I’m just thinking you’re supposed to add it while cooking, not at the table.

        It kinda depends. For example half my family likes things on the saltier side, while the other half likes things not very salty. Some after-salting helps a lot to make everyone happy. It doesn’t fully replace proper salting while cooking, though.

        • @[email protected]
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          22 months ago

          Yeah, I have older parents that need food with less sodium as well, so all of my food has less of it, and I add more at the table.

  • @[email protected]
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    122 months ago

    Like there is so much salt in processed food

    I cook a lot of my own food, so I use a salt shaker a lot.

  • @[email protected]
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    82 months ago

    I use potassium salt and a lot of the stuff I eat is homemade so I dont feel any guilt pouring the salt on if I choose

  • Otherbarry
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    2 months ago

    I use a sea salt grinder to lightly salt things when cooking. Can’t afford to eat out too often so cooking is my normal routine.

    Other people, especially older people, do pour salt on pretty much all meals. Especially with older people who tend to be able to taste things less strongly so their normal response is to add even more salt. And then they wonder why they have high blood pressure, etc.

    You mentioned iodine but that’s usually an additive in table salt, not sure how many people eat table salt vs other types of salt… me personally I’ve been using sea salt for years & that type usually does not have iodine.

  • @[email protected]
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    42 months ago

    I usually get the low/no sodium options so that I can use my salt shaker. I don’t know if it’s the iodine, but pre salted foods are always bland to me and i end up adding a ton of extra salt anyway.

  • amio
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    42 months ago

    I salt my food, of course. I’d like it to taste like things.

    It may not be the healthiest, but also bland food is just tragic.

  • @[email protected]
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    2 months ago

    I use a lite salt (50/50 sodium potassium). I take 1g in hot water in the morning and afternoon.

    When I eat meals I liberally salt and flavor my food.

    I base this on advice from my PCP, and the PURE study which demonstrates a much higher salt range for health then conventional advice would have us consume.

    Video for those who don’t like to read studies Blaming Salt

    That being said, I avoid processed foods as much as I can.

    • @[email protected]
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      32 months ago

      I’m also recommended salt by my cardiologist and neurologist, primarily to raise my blood volume. Without it my blood pressure may run low and I get less blood to the upper half of my body. I mainly get my salt by adding electrolytes in my water throughout the day since I also need increased water intake. Though, I may sprinkle a little iodized salt on my meals if I feel I need it.

  • @[email protected]
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    32 months ago

    I have some sea salt flakes I use in whatever I’m cooking, if it’s needed. Most things taste nicer with a bit of salt in.

  • @[email protected]
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    32 months ago

    I’ve got some pretty major food allergies, so I eat almost exclusively home-cooked meals, and I use the salt shaker quite a lot

  • Introversion
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    22 months ago

    When I cook, I usually salt after tasting. (I’ve recently switched to so-called “light salt”, which substitutes some potassium chloride for sodium chloride.)

    When I dine out, seldom — I find most restaurants add enough salt for me.

    • @[email protected]
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      22 months ago

      We swapped our lo-salt as the brand was called for that himalayas pink salt recently, as the missus read a bunch of bumf about the very alleged benefits.

      • MuchPineapples
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        32 months ago

        Pink salt is just contaminated pure salt. In a normal world that would be considered trash quality.

        • @[email protected]
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          12 months ago

          I have to agree, seemed to be the hot bullshit health thing for a bit there though, so a big fucking box of the stuff is in my pantry now