• @WildlyCanadian
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    193 months ago

    We need to fuck off with the fines. If the penalty for something is a fine, it just becomes the price of doing said illegal thing, and doesn’t de-incentivise it at all. People need to start going to jail, or else the crimes of these companies are just going to get worse and worse because there’s no reason for them not to. Like, oh no we were fined 1.3M but we made 5M from doing the illegal thing so it’s ultimately worth it.

    • @Someone
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      3 months ago

      If a fine is going to be effective it has to be multiple times the crime. So the $5m crime is punishable by a $20m fine or something like that. Or even better for massive corporations, if it was based on their total revenue/market value. Fine them a huge percentage of the company.

      • @LostWon
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        43 months ago

        If someone charged them $20 billion (4x the $5B someone else quoted below), they might just go bankrupt and regular customers could get hung out to dry. The responsible individuals must get criminal charges like with any non-corporate case of criminal negligence/corruption, and there can be a hefty assessed fee or confiscation of profits.

    • @[email protected]
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      43 months ago

      Our regulatory bodies have people that rotate in and out of the banking industry on the regular. Until this stops, we will never, EVER, see positive change.

      Our government will continue to divide people with incompetent initiatives and then keep taking money from these companies on the down low, pretending all the while like the regulators are going to do something.

      There’s not a single regulatory body in Canada that isn’t absolutely riddled with the cancer of large corporate money paying off the ‘regulators’ that work in those offices, or, straight up offering the regulators jobs if they just look the other way for the more heinous crimes and do small fines for the more obvious crimes.

      So, keep in mind, that if this is what CIBC is being fined for and this is considered ‘small’, what are they doing that the regulators know about and are actively ignoring to keep the public in the dark?

    • @ILikeBoobies
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      13 months ago

      Jail would be less of a punishment

      Companies don’t go to jail, people do and for $1.3m you’ll find a lot of people who are willing to be fall guys

      Also that’s what Barney from HIMYM did

    • funkajunk
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      3 months ago

      Not even pennies, they reported over $5B net income for 2023 alone.

      For the year ended October 31, 2023, CIBC reported net income of $5.0 billion and adjusted net income(1) of $6.5 billion, compared with reported net income of $6.2 billion and adjusted net income(1) of $6.6 billion for 2022, and adjusted pre-provision, pre-tax earnings(1) of $10.2 billion, compared with $9.4 billion for 2022.

      Source

  • AutoTL;DRB
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    13 months ago

    This is the best summary I could come up with:


    Canada’s financial intelligence agency says it has levied a $1.3-million penalty against CIBC for non-compliance with money laundering and terrorist financing measures.

    The penalty is the second the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada has announced this week after RBC’s $7.4-million fine was publicized on Tuesday.

    The agency, known as Fintrac, says it imposed the penalty over CIBC’s failure to submit a suspicious transaction report when there were grounds to suspect it was related to money laundering or terrorist activity, and failures to report information related to large money transfers from outside Canada.

    Fintrac tries to pinpoint money linked to illicit activities by electronically sifting through millions of pieces of information each year from banks, insurance companies, money services businesses and others.

    It says it found an instance where CIBC didn’t file a suspicious transaction report even as it knew the client had been arrested and charged with criminal offences, while the agency’s review also found over a thousand instances, out of a sample of 20,000, where information related to money transfers was incomplete.

    CIBC spokesman Tom Wallis says the administrative matters are related to a relatively small number of transactions and that the bank will continue to identify, investigate and do its part to deter and detect financial crimes.


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