An invasive species of mosquito has been found in 13 countries in the EU, including France, Spain and Greece, with experts linking their discovery to a rise in dengue fever in Europe.

Climate change is creating favourable conditions for the tiger mosquito to spread, said the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC).

As far north as Paris, where the Olympic Games will take place at the end of July, authorities have been monitoring and trapping the insect.

The ECDC has warned international travel will further increase the risk of more European outbreaks.

The Asian tiger mosquito, aedes albopictus, which is thought to be the most invasive species of mosquito in the world, is now spreading across Europe from its southern European ‘base camp’.

  • AFK BRB Chocolate@lemmy.world
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    1 month ago

    Man, e got those here in southern California a few years back. They are so awful! They can breed in tiny amounts of water, like what’s in a cupped leaf on the ground. They don’t just bite at dusk, they do it anytime of the day or night. They aren’t great flyers, so they tend to bite your ankles or lower leg if they can. And their bites are horrendous - super itchy, big welts.

    • girlfreddyOP
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      1 month ago

      Ugh. I’m further north so they’re not here yet, but I swell up like a balloon from black fly bites and no-see-ums. Can’t imagine what’ll it be like with these things.

      • AFK BRB Chocolate@lemmy.world
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        1 month ago

        If/when they get there, the only things that we’ve found that help are fans (because they aren’t strong flyers, you can blow them away) and those mosquito catchers that lure them in with heat, light, and CO2. Actually DEET works well, but we don’t really want to cover ourselves with it everyday.

        • girlfreddyOP
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          1 month ago

          I DEETed for years tree planting. Mostly stopped since I moved back to the city, but if I have to again, I will.

          • AFK BRB Chocolate@lemmy.world
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            1 month ago

            Oh, the other bad news: they seem good at finding their way into the house, so a lot of the bites we’ve gotten have been inside. Who wants to sit on the couch covered in DEET?

            Also, one mosquito will bite multiple times. They really suck (no pun intended).

  • CALIGVLA@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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    1 month ago

    I fucking hate these bastards so much. I wish we as a species would genocide all mosquitos out of existence, I’d happily live with whatever biological fallout may happen as a result as long as I never have to be near one of these ever again in my lifetime.

    • Hugucinogens@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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      1 month ago

      Hey hey now! No need to be that way!

      Studies until now show that mosquitoes seem to never be keystone species anywhere, so eradicating them probably won’t cause any fallout whatsoever!

      Be more optimistic with your annihilation fantasy. We all deserve it.

  • AutoTL;DR@lemmings.worldB
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    1 month ago

    This is the best summary I could come up with:


    As far north as Paris, where the Olympic Games will take place at the end of July, authorities have been monitoring and trapping the insect.The ECDC has warned international travel will further increase the risk of more European outbreaks.It has advised people to remove stagnant water from gardens or balconies, where mosquitoes can breed, and use repellent and mosquito nets at night.

    It has become established in Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia and Spain, according to the ECDC.It has also been recorded in Belgium, Cyprus, Czechia, the Netherlands and Slovakia.Tiger mosquitoes spread diseases such as dengue fever, chikungunya and Zika virus which, until recently, were typically only present in parts of Africa, Asia and the Americas.Another mosquito, aedes aegypti, which transmits yellow fever, as well as other diseases, has set up home in Cyprus.

    Experts say its potential for spreading to other parts of Europe is “concerning” given its preference for biting humans, and its ability to transmit disease.

    But locally-acquired infections are also rising: 130 people were affected in 2023, up from 71 the year before.West Nile virus, which is also transmitted by mosquitoes, is now present in more European regions than ever before.One person was reported to be infected by the virus in southern Spain at the start of March, highlighting how climate conditions are creating a suitable environment for mosquitoes even “very early in the year”, the ECDC said.

    “Europe is already seeing how climate change is creating more favourable conditions for invasive mosquitos to spread into previously unaffected areas and infect more people with diseases such as dengue," said ECDC director Andrea Ammon.

    "Ms Ammon advises people take “personal protective measures”, adding that "early detection of cases, timely surveillance, further research and awareness-raising activities are paramount in those areas in Europe most at risk”.


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