This community is primarily structured around the sort of subjects you would see in an academic setting, but learning skills is absolutely within the scope of this community. If you have any, please consider commenting with free resources and advice for things like playing an instrument, learning a language, woodworking, etc.

    • spaduf@slrpnk.netOPM
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      2
      ·
      6 months ago

      This is amazing. May also be worthwhile to put together some resources from those templates.

    • pseudo@slrpnk.net
      link
      fedilink
      arrow-up
      1
      ·
      4 months ago

      I love it. It’s not a study plan but more a serie of mini goals that will make you progress if reach them. It is also a very fun way to track your progress.

  • jadero@slrpnk.net
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    3
    ·
    6 months ago

    For woodworking with hand tools:

    You can’t go wrong with Paul Sellers.

    For printed materials, there is Christopher Schwarz and his Lost Art Press. Obviously, the books aren’t free, but his first in the “Anarchist” series transformed my approach to my hobbies, not just woodworking.

    The YouTube channel Frank’s Workbench has a lot of great stuff, too.

  • sodalite@slrpnk.net
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    2
    ·
    5 months ago

    Learn various coding languages with Codecademy. Follow career or skill paths, or jump around to whatever course you need. https://www.codecademy.com/

    Free with paid certificate options. I’ve personally found the free content to be enough, supplemented with YouTube videos or coding project ideas from elsewhere around the web.

  • sustarces@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    2
    ·
    5 months ago

    The library: It’s nothing sexy but I’ve always had luck going to the library and grabbing all of the books off the shelf on the subject I’m learning. I then sit at a table and quickly scan through the stack. After finding the ones that seem the most valuable of the lot I take those home and work through them. I was lucky to live in a major city so my library had a ton of content.

  • sustarces@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    arrow-up
    2
    ·
    5 months ago

    For automotive repair the 3 best resources I’ve found are youtube, buying a Haynes repair manual, and the ALLDATA website. Youtube has videos for doing most things on your car/truck, a Haynes repair manual walks you through a ton of basic to advanced procedures (it pays for itself), and repair shops use ALLDATA. It’s more advanced and a bit less intuitive but a great resource. I get it free through my local library which is great too!