Growth in german wind capacity is slowing. Soo… then the plan is to keep on with lignite and gas? Am I missing something?

Installed Wind Capacty - Germany

German Wind Capacity

  • NataliePortland
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    557 months ago

    Wow I’m surprised to see people are actually downvoting you and arguing about this. It’s common knowledge that the cost, impact, and build-time of new nuclear plants makes them a poor choice for energy. Not only is wind/ solar cheaper, it’s faster to build.

    • Blake [he/him]
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      217 months ago

      Redditors are unbelievably brainwashed in this topic, and a lot of Redditors moved over to Lemmy. I have dragged this metaphor to water countless times before, and when I suggest that they could consider drinking, they just arrogantly declare that I don’t understand the facts around liquids, that I don’t have any basis for my claims that they should drink it, and that by arguing that people should drink more water, I somehow supporting Coca-Cola.

    • @[email protected]
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      107 months ago

      It’s also common knowledge that the more often you build something, the lower its price tends to go as that knowledge spreads. It’s part of the reason it’s so expensive to build trains in the US and so cheap in South Korea and Spain.

      • @[email protected]
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        327 months ago

        This famously isn’t true for nuclear power. It just keeps getting more expensive.

        The French nuclear case illustrates the perils of the assumption of robust learning effects resulting in lowered costs over time in the scale-up of large-scale, complex new energy supply technologies. The uncertainties in anticipated learning effects of new technologies might be much larger that often assumed, including also cases of “negative learning” in which specific costs increase rather than decrease with accumulated experience.

        https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0301421510003526

        And this research was done before Fukushima, which increased costs even further.

      • Blake [he/him]
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        237 months ago

        This is just more reasons to prioritise the already cheaper renewables, isn’t it?

          • It is not a yes and, because urgency favors renewables even more. If it wouldn’t be for bureaucratic and political hurdles, from planning to operation is about 2 years for onshore wind and solar sites. For things like retrofitting a small solar plant on a residential or industrial building it can be as short as three months and for balcony solar power as a small hobby project it is as little as a day of planning + the delivery time + a day of installation.

            Nuclear plants on the other side take minimum a decade, more likely two decades and that is despite strong political and bureaucratic support that is needed to get it going at all. Otherwise with citizens protest it would stay in court indefenitely.