Louis getting pissed off by gym memberships is very entertaining. And he is right!

  • The Barto@sh.itjust.works
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    11 months ago

    This is why I periodically “lose” my card and request a new one, you’ll get a few emails from places and you can fix up the subscriptions you actually want and ignore the rest.

      • The Barto@sh.itjust.works
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        11 months ago

        That might save me some time, I use zippay for some things, but they only let you make separate cards for specific subscriptions.

      • WhoRoger@lemmy.world
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        11 months ago

        I use Revolut. Anyone wants a referral code? They usually give some welcome money to those who sign up through referral (and kickback to who referred, obviously).

  • zoe @infosec.pub
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    11 months ago

    This video discusses the rise of subscription scams and the difficulty customers face when trying to cancel their subscriptions. The creator calls out companies for using tactics like convoluted EULAs and requiring certified mail for cancellation. They recommend using services like privacy.com to create virtual credit cards that can be easily closed to prevent unwanted charges. The video also highlights the lack of consumer protection laws and biased credit card providers. Despite potential credit score consequences, the creator prioritizes principles over convenience and expresses a willingness to fight against unjust subscription practices.

    00:00:00 In this section, the video discusses the rise of subscription scams and how some companies make it extremely difficult for customers to cancel their subscriptions. The example of gym memberships is used, where signing up online is easy, but cancelling requires sending certified mail or jumping through other hoops. The creator calls this tactic “Eula Roofing,” where consent is obtained, but not under fair circumstances. To combat this, the creator recommends using services like privacy.com to create virtual credit cards that can be easily closed, preventing companies from charging for unwanted services. 00:05:00 In this section, the speaker discusses the rise of subscription scams and how companies make it difficult for customers to cancel their subscriptions. They criticize the use of lengthy and convoluted End-User License Agreements (EULAs) that require certified mail for cancellation or automatically renew contracts without consent. The speaker argues that businesses with such practices have a “rapist mentality” and justifies using services like privacy.com to fight back. They also highlight the lack of consumer protection laws and the bias of credit card providers towards businesses rather than customers. Despite potential credit score consequences, the speaker prioritizes principles over convenience and expresses a willingness to fight against unjust subscription practices. 00:10:00 In this section, the speaker expresses frustration with the way large companies make it difficult to cancel subscriptions and the impact it can have on personal credit scores. They suggest using virtual credit cards as a way to protect oneself when signing up for new services. They also mention that they are not sponsored by any company and instead support themselves through merchandise sales featuring their cat. The section ends with a playful interaction with the cat.